NCCJ: Establishment of Ecumenical Disaster Response Office (JEDRO)

Aus einem Schreiben des Moderators des NCC Japan

Pfarrer KOSHISHI Isamu


pr_fs_hilfe_jedro

DATE: June 27, 2011

TO: Ecumenical Partners
CC: NCCJ Members
FR: Isamu Koshiishi, Moderator and Acting General Secretary

Subject: Establishment of NCC Japan Ecumenical Disaster Response Office (JEDRO)

Thank you for continuing to give your time and energy to be in solidarity with us as we seek to consolidate and establish our efforts in response to our March 11 "Triple Disaster." I am pleased to update you on the direction being charted for the next stage of our NCC JEDRO response.

Action of the NCCJ Executive Council

As I indicated to some of you already, the NCCJ Officers formulated a proposal for setting up a subsidiary desk to coordinate international disaster relief efforts. The establishment of JEDRO was our considered response to an appeal from the Seoul International Ecumenical Solidarity Meeting communicated to us on behalf of the participants by the General Secretary of NCC Korea, the Rev. Kim Young-Ju.

The NCCJ Executive Council approved the recommendation of the Officers on May 27. We envision this as the first step in the process of putting together an ecumenical and international consortium. In the early stage, some of the present NCCJ Officers will serve as the temporary Steering Committee in consultation with the international "Solidarity Forum" members as well as with our NCCJ membership.
On the basis of the mandate given by the Executive Council, the Steering Committee has adopted this Mission Statement:

The National Christian Council - Japan Ecumenical Disaster Response Office (JEDRO) is established as a response of the NCCJ to the triple disaster following the massive earthquake of March 11, 2011. Manifesting the unity of the Church of Jesus Christ, JEDRO seeks to be a tangible and visible sign of hope for the people in Japan, especially the survivors, through active engagement in relief, rehabilitation and reconstruction, and advocacy for alternative, safe and environmentally-sound renewal energy, It will also address the spiritual and psychological trauma of a devastated nation that thirsts for an ethical, responsive and compassionate government. Seeking to demonstrate God's love for all people in Japan, JEDRO will work closely with the NCCJ member organizations by supporting their existing or future activities. Recognizing the enormity of the challenge and the necessity of an effective response for the long haul, JEDRO welcomes the solidarity of international ecumenical and church agencies as well as the partnership of interested organizations in Japan.

The mandate given to JEDRO takes into account our situation in which many of our NCCJ members have already engaged themselves in various relief activities. We wish to support and not interrupt these important efforts. However, it is very much our hope that as JEDRO becomes operational our NCCJ members will want to work closely with us in their future plans.

Action of the JEDRO Steering Committee

Following the decision of the Executive Council, the Steering Committee has worked diligently to establish JEDRO. It: Adopted a Mission Statement
Invited Victor Hsu to be its ecumenical consultant.
Worked out staffing arrangements between NCCJ and JEDRO. Some NCCJ staff will share part of their time with JEDRO especially in bookkeeping, logistics and procurement.
Leased an office in the Japan Christian Building, same building as NCCJ.
Equipped and furnished the JEDRO office.
Employed a full-time Executive Assistant.
Set up a separate JEDRO bank account. Clarified the roles of ACT, UMCOR and CWS with regard to their existing commitments and programs prior to the establishment of JEDRO.
Identified programmatic priorities.
Identified staffing needs.

Going forward, the Steering Committee will:

Set up systems, structures and program
Develop institutional and personnel policies and procedures
Hire full complement of staff

 

Home Page:

www.jedro.jp (Hopefully by July 1)

We will need to fund the JEDRO projects and staff. In this regard, we welcome your generous financial contribution including secondment of personnel.  We are urgently looking for a Communications Officer. We are grateful to Church World Service for its contribution of US$ 20,000 towards the cost of an administrative staff. Attached are two projects of JEDRO for your support. These are developed after careful consultation with local partners in the affected Tohoku area. Through them, we shall continue to provide immediate help to the evacuees and survivors in various ways. We will respond to the nuclear disaster in a comprehensive and systematic manner and we invite and welcome your participation and support at all phases of our work.

We want you to know that our members have supported our relief activities and so far have contributed over ¥7.9 million*. Our overseas partners have been very generous too donating ¥ 11.6 million* by the end of May. The balance of these relief funds as of June have been transferred to JEDRO,

The warm support and assistance of our ecumenical partners is deeply appreciated. We cannot fulfill our mission task alone. With your solidarity we can venture into the unknown, trusting God's sustaining power and hope in the love of Jesus to give light to our path as we journey forth together.

With sincere gratitude,
Rev. Isamu Koshiishi NCCJ Moderator and Acting General Secretary


(*Anm.: 7,9 million Yen = 69.000,-€; 11,6 million Yen = 101.000,-€)


Projekt 1 (NCCJ-JEDRO)

betrifft die nukleare Verstrahlung in der Fukushima-Provinz. Die Planung läuft in 3 Phasen bis zum 30. Juni 2012. Die Finanzierung beläuft sich auf insgesamt ca. 890.000,- EURO Dafür erbittet die DOAM in Kooperation mit EMS, BMW und JEDRO Spenden.

 

GRANT APPLICATION
June 27, 2011
APPLICANT: NCC J Ecumenical Disaster Response Office (JEDRO)

Project Title:
Helping Survivors and Moving toward a Denuclearized Society, Response to March 11, 2011 Fukushima Disaster Budget: ¥ 101,981,300
Project Liaison: Kei Jokura Project Consultant: Victor Hsu

Timeline: July 1, 2011 - June 30, 2012

JEDRO was mandated by the Executive Council of the National Christian Council in Japan on May 27, 2011 as the response of the members of NCCJ to the triple disaster that struck Japan's Tohoku area on March 11, 2011.


The Mission Statement of JEDRO

The National Christian Council - Japan Ecumenical Disaster Response Office (JEDRO) is established as a response of the NCCJ to the triple disaster following the massive earthquake of March 11, 2011. Manifesting the unity of the Church of Jesus Christ, JEDRO seeks to be a tangible and visible sign of hope for the people in Japan, especially the survivors, through active engagement in relief, rehabilitation and reconstruction, and advocacy for alternative, safe and environmentally-sound renewal energy, It will also address the spiritual and psychological trauma of a devastated nation that thirsts for an ethical, responsive and compassionate government. Seeking to demonstrate God's love for all people in Japan, JEDRO will work closely with the NCCJ member organizations by supporting their existing or future activities. Recognizing the enormity of the challenge and the necessity of an effective response for the long haul, JEDRO welcomes the solidarity of international ecumenical and church agencies as well as the partnership of interested organizations in Japan.

 

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

 

Background

"Having been the first nation amongst humankind to suffer casualties due to atomic weapons and having experienced the ferocity of nuclear power, therefore, as Christians living in Japan who should be working toward the goal of a denuclearized society,"

NCCJ Message to Prime Minister Naoto Kan dated April 11, 2011

Japan is at a policy crossroads lacking a clear direction for addressing immediate needs of residents after the triple disaster and a long-term strategy for recovery. Japan's political parties are deadlocked over the priorities and conditions for the emergency budget for post-disaster reconstruction and economic revival. A citizens' policy agenda is therefore urgently needed to show the way forward in addressing the priorities of the affected communities, Japan's national interest and the international community.

JEDRO is committed to do its own part in this significant undertaking. This project proposal is based on the NCCJ Message to Prime Minister Naoto Kan dated April 11, 2011. The NCCJ message makes the following demands of the government:

Totally abolish all domestic nuclear power plants and related facilities.
Cleanup radioactive waste. Initiate a credible investigation of the cause of the nuclear disaster.
Disclose accurate information concerning the status of the accident, radioactive contamination and other issues
Mandatory evacuation of local citizens in areas with high levels of radiation contamination (based on accurate measurements) carried out by the government.
A sincere apology and compensation must be given to all those who suffered loss due to the accident. ã

JEDRO recognizes that there is much international concern about the handling of disaster by the Tokyo Electric Power Co and the government of Japan. It also is keenly aware that the whole world continues to feel threatened by the meltdown and the continuing instability of the reactors of the Fukushima Daiichi Power Plant. The implementation of the project will therefore involve ecumenical partners from around the world beginning with those in the North East Asia region,


Situation
According to the latest report of the Japan's National Police Agency, 15281 people are confirmed dead while 8492 are still unaccounted for. Over 5363 people are injured and many remain in hospitals. At least 88873 houses and 71 bridges are destroyed. The Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant continues to cause serious public concern among the people due to lack of reliable data about the nuclear fallout in the early days of the disaster. Japan's Nuclear Emergency Response Headquarters finally admitted that reactors 1, 2, and 3 at the Fukushima plant experienced full meltdowns. The Tokyo Electric Power Company announced that the accident probably released more radioactive material than Chernobyl, making it the worst nuclear accident in history. Meanwhile, a nuclear waste advisor to the Japanese government reported that about 966 square kilometres near the power station may be likely uninhabitable.

In response to public pressure, the government has announced that beginning September all families with school children in the Tohoku area will be provided with docimer counters which will provide radiation readings on the human body. Since June 1, every school in Fukushima prefecture has receives one Geiger Counter which serves only like a "dosimeter in a badge-style." The Teachers' Association and parents organization are requesting ground contamination monitors for all hot spots. They are gravely concerned about lethal Cesium contamination. It is most urgent for civic leaders to be able to communicate nuclear fallout data to the parents and children. There is scant information given to the teachers and local communities.

Reportedly over 330 people have died as a result of radiation exposure. The government has established a 10-member Panel of Investigation. The International Atomic Energy Commission (IAEA) has recently completed a visit to the Fukushima Daiichi Plant and its report is expected soon.

Meantime, the government has ordered many evacuation centers to be returned to their original owners by a given date so that businesses will resume in those facilities. There are an estimated 65,000 evacuees using about 600 facilities or institutions as temporary shelter. Those who are forced to relocate from these centers may choose to go into government provided housing or make their own arrangements. In the latest legislation passed by the Diet, each evacuee will receive 1.5 million Japanese Yen. This amount will be distributed by the Japan Red Cross. For a vulnerable group that has suffered incalculable human cost, the government's decision to evacuate the survivors from the Evacuation Centers is exacting further toll on them. In an evacuation center despite the lack of privacy, the survivors have themselves bonded into a supportive community of their own. They also know what to expect for food, shelter and medicine. They will lose their community and a sense of security, and become isolated if they are relocated to other temporary housing or government-sponsored hotel rooms. The dispersion of evacuees will make it harder to monitor the health of those who may have been exposed to radiation.

Proposed Interventions


Objectives:
Monitor government investigation of the Fukushima Daiichi Power Plant meltdown to ensure that information about the investigation is made public on a regular basis. Advocate for alternative renewable sources of energy as a national policy.
Monitor the government's healthcare program with regard to the survivors who have been exposed to radiation and advocate for the survivors.
Monitor government's relocation plans for the survivors to ensure that the location is uncontaminated and is safe.

Advocate for the just compensation for the survivors and assist in the recovery of their livelihood.

Ensure that the Japanese government clean up the contaminated areas in Tohoku and that the reconstruction of Tohoku proceed with deliberate care so that the communities are deemed safe for rehabilitation.

Ensure that the Japanese government act responsibly in the disposition of the nuclear waste and all contaminated material including the huge amount of water that had been used to cool the reactor.

Cooperate with the international community in ensuring a denuclearized world.


Activities:

(Phase I to Phase III)


PHASE I
Respond to Fukushima residents requests by providing Geiger Counters (Gamma Spectrometers LB 2045) to local communities and farmers starting with the major cities of Fukushima Prefecture (Fukushima, Koriyama and Iwaki.) This device accurately measures the contamination of vegetables including the nuclide. It will help farmers to decide whether grow the produce. It will ensure the consumers' right to know about contamination levels of vegetables, thereby avoiding unnecessary exposure. As a result, these devices will aid producers in selling vegetables and support their livelihoods. One has also been requested by the Asian Rural Institute (ARI.)

Respond to the teachers and parents grave concerns about ongoing soil and boy contamination especially by the lethal Cesium. 226 schools and localities in Fukushima Prefecture (Appendix A) to receive the RADEX Geiger counter (RD1503.) It is a highly effective detector of Beta particles, and X and Gamma rays (called ionizing rays) and measures the Beta particles and ionizations created by X and Gamma rays to indicate the 'quantity of energy' transmitted to matter over a certain amount of time.

Conduct a workshop with international participation to identify the tasks of JEDRO
Establish an International Advisory Committee to assist the NCCJ Peace and Nuclear Issues Committee
Employment of Staff

PHASE II
Conduct survey to determine immediate needs of affected populations.

Since residents are dislocated, with many now in evacuee centers far from Fukushima, the survey effort must make some adaptations to the reality of social disruption and sheer physical obstruction caused by the disaster. Questions will also be geared to the psychology of traumatized communities. Monitor the work of the government's 10-member Commission of Enquiry into the Fukushima Nuclear Plant disaster.

Plan for Advocacy of the Needs of the dislocated residents who might have suffered from the nuclear fallout and for just compensation for Fukushima residents.

Support citizen's movement against more nuclear power plants, including lawsuits, and legislation to abolish nuclear power plants

Develop a long-term project base on Phase III issues.

 

APPENDIX A

Eine Liste von über 100 Primary und High Schools in der Provinz Fukushima

 

Projekt 2 (NCCJ-JEDRO)

betrifft das bereits bestehende Programm Tohoku HELP in Sendai. Die Finanzierung für Phase 1 beläuft sich auf insgesamt ca. 366.500,- EURO Dafür erbittet die DOAM in Kooperation mit EMS, BMW und JEDRO Spenden.

 

GRANT APPLICATION
June 27, 2011

APPLICANT: NCC- J Ecumenical Disaster Response Office (JEDRO)
Project Liaison: Baekki Hoe
Project Consultant
: Victor Hsu

Budget: ¥ 42,000,000 (Phase 1 only)
[ca. 366.500,-EURO]

Timeline: July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2012.

JEDRO was mandated by the Executive Council of the National Christian Council in Japan on May 27, 2011 as the response of the members of NCCJ to the triple disaster that struck Japan's Tohoku area on March 11, 2011.


The Mission Statement of JEDRO

The National Christian Council - Japan Ecumenical Disaster Response Office (JEDRO) is established as a response of the NCCJ to the triple disaster following the devastating Richter-scale earthquake of March 11, 2011.

Manifesting the unity of the Church of Jesus Christ, JEDRO seeks to be a tangible and visible sign of hope for the people in Japan, especially the survivors, through active engagement in relief, rehabilitation and reconstruction, and advocacy for alternative, safe and environmentally-sound renewal energy, It will also address the spiritual and psychological trauma of a devastated nation that thirsts for an ethical, responsive and compassionate government. Seeking to demonstrate God's love for all people in Japan, JEDRO will work closely with the NCCJ member organizations by supporting their existing or future activities. Recognizing the enormity of the challenge and the necessity of an effective response for the long haul, JEDRO welcomes the solidarity of international ecumenical and church agencies as well as the partnership of interested organizations in Japan.

 

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:

Tohoku HELP

Background

Tohoku HELP began as a Christian response to the disaster. It builds on the initial work of the Sendai Christian Alliance Disaster Relief Network. Since June it has evolved into an inter-faith organization with active participation of Buddhist organizations. It has been engaged in relief activities from March 18th: coordinating the response of international NGOs and churches in the disaster. It also collaborated with the government, regional communities and other religious groups. All the income was locally generated during this initial stage. To respond urgent requests from local churches and related organizations to continue Tohoku HELP activities, organizations that make up Tohoku HELP met intensively to devise a longer term response strategy. This project proposal represents the product of an intensive consultation process amongst the stakeholders.

Tohoku HELP is also involved in starting another project called Care of the Heart.

It comprises counseling by telephone, a "traveling café to access communities and make it easier for survivors to take advantage of the services, a regular 25-minute FM radio program involving celebrities and religious leaders and special public lectures and seminars that address the needs of the survivors.

These activities will also be coordinated and arranged by Tohoku HELP.

These activities will cost about ¥ 9 million and are being submitted to organizations which deal with interreligious issues.

 

Situation

According to the latest report of the Japan's National Policy Agency, 15281 people are confirmed dead while 8492 are still unaccounted for.

Over 5363 people are injured and many remain in hospitals.

At least 88873 houses and 71 bridges are destroyed. The Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant continues to cause serious public concern among the people due to lack of reliable data about the nuclear fallout. The government has announced that beginning September all families with school children in the Tohoku area will be provided with docimer counters which will provide radiation readings on the human body.

Meantime, the government has ordered many evacuation centers to be returned to their original owners by a given date so that businesses will resume in those facilities. There are an estimated 65,000 evacuees using about 600 facilities or institutions as temporary shelter. Those who are forced to relocate from these centers may choose to go into government provided housing or make their own arrangements. In the latest legislation passed by the Diet, each evacuee will receive 1.5 million Japanese Yen. This amount will be distributed by the Japan Red Cross. For a vulnerable group that has suffered incalculable human cost, the government's decision to evacuate the survivors from the Evacuation Centers is exacting further toll on them. In an evacuation center despite the lack of privacy, the survivors have themselves bonded into a supportive community of their own. 

They also know what to expect for food, shelter and medicine.

They will lose their community and a sense of security, and become isolated if they are relocated to other temporary housing or government-sponsored hotel rooms.

This proposal foresees the possible consequences of the government's action and is intended to meet the challenges in an effective and timely manner by establishing new community centers to which they can turn for immediate assistance including counseling.

 

Vision of Tohoku HELP for the Future

Integrating mission and support based on listening and be sensitive to the feelings of survivors. Relief activities shall not be for the purpose of direct evangelism.
A new opportunity for church organizations in Japan to contribute concretely to the rebuilding of the region, gain the trust of the government and become trusted advocates of the people.

Demonstrate compassion through providing needed goods.
Build a relationship of long-term trust with the people who come for emergency goods.
Bear witness to God's love for all people.

Strategy: the "Grand House" Centers

Several Centers will be built in strategic locations around Tohoku using local resources and expertise.

JEDRO will

Facilitate and coordinate the program of establishing "Grand Houses" throughout the Tohoku region.

Establish "Grand House" Centers which will serve as: Warehouse for goods still needed by evacuees.
Counseling site where an on-site "chaplain" will be available to talk with those coming to pick up goods from the warehouse.

Support the local social workers to continue to serve the immediate and longer term needs of persons, especially with the elderly, disabled, and others needing special care such as separated families in:
Evacuation centers.
Temporary housing.
Those remaining in their own housing (even though partially damaged), etc.


Role of "Grand House"

Centers


The "Grand House" Centers are based on a concept of Church as a connecting link with the local community. It will cooperate with NGOs and other organizations and each center will function as an open and welcoming space for the local community.

 

Four Priority Areas where "Grand House" Centers are to be established:

Churches with long-term support from outside Tohoku (group) Churches in disaster areas (Kesennuma, Gamo, etc.)
Where work is already being done by various denominations
Where no existing work is being done. In all four areas, there will be collaboration, consultation, and coordination with Tohoku HELP for providing information on people, relief goods, and funding.


Phases of Work

First Phase

Set up an administrative center in Sendai to plan the first two Grand House Centers. It will continue emergency relief goods, clean-up, soup kitchens, etc.

The two Grand House Centers in Sendai will each take care of 200 evacuee households and about 300 evacuees each day.

Second Phase

Matching community needs for aid and services through linking with cooperative support groups (which may come from local area churches).

Third Phase

Establishment of NPOs and social contribution corporations for implementation of locally based long-term support.

(During this phase, the focus will be on local initiative that will provide support for area reconstruction and move towards their independence as support organizations.)
Collaboration with incorporated businesses in meeting local needs, such as care-giving, medical, welfare, daycare, and various local industries.

 

Role of Tohoku HELP and Relationships with Inter-denominational Churches in

"Comprehensive Coordination Function" " Using the strengths of local churches
Serve as a channel for donations, support relief goods, people, information, etc.
Serve as a channel for mutual support center requests and adjustments
Serve as a channel for making requests for foreign aid

"Direct Management Function" - Implementing a direct management center locally
Carrying out the business with an understanding of local needs.
Smooth flow of communication with other centers

"Inter-denominational Center" - Providing support for organizations already operating
Support churches and denominations that are carrying out long-term support projects so they can perform even more efficiently.
Provide support for churches and denominations upon their request to coordinate funding, people, information, relations with government offices and other local institutions, etc., within an understanding of the center concept.
Churches (and other organizations) involved will sign a simple agreement, exchange information and conduct collaborative exchanges, etc.

 

Monitoring, Reporting and Evaluation

The JEDRO liaison will monitor the activities on a monthly basis and report to the Steering Committee.

JEDRO will provide donors with reports as requested and required. Evaluation will be carried out by the ecumenical consultant on a quarterly basis and in cooperation with donors and ACT Alliance on a semiannual basis. 

The evaluation report will be shared with all donors.

All records, including financial transactions such as materials purchase, logistical and administrative expenditures, will be kept on file and made available to donors upon request.

 

Bankverbindung der DOAM für Katastrophenhilfe Japan

Vergessen Sie bitte das Kennwort nicht!

Deutsche Ostasienmission
VB Kurpfalz H+G BANK
BLZ 672 901 00
Kontonummer: 65554100

Kennwort: Sendai Projekt 1
oder
Sendai Projekt 2

Wenn Sie nur "Sendai" angeben, überlassen Sie der DOAM, welchem der beiden Projekte sie Ihre Spende zuweist.

Die Spenden gehen ohne jeden Abzug an den Katastrophenfond der Partner in Japan: den Nationalen Christenrat in Japan NCCJ.
Spendenbescheinigungen werden verschickt .

 

Presseerklärung der Solidaritätskonferenz mit Japan

Seoul, Korea am 6.-7. Mai 2011

PRESS RELEASE

JAPAN EARTHQUAKE/TSUNAMI RELIEF ECUMENICAL SOLIDARITY MEETING
Seoul, Korea, May 6-7, 2011

The heads of North East Asia Churches Forum of the Christian Conference of Asia (CCA) convened an ecumenical solidarity meeting to discuss coordination and cooperation to carry out relief, recovery and reconstruction in Japan in the face of the "triple disaster" of earthquake, tsunami and nuclear plant failure that took place on March 11, 2011 in the North East Japan. The meeting was hosted by the National Council of Churches in Korea (NCCK) on May 6 and 7 and brought together representatives of around 40 Christian partner organizations gathered at Academy House Hotel, in Seoul, Korea including experienced ecumenical relief and reconstruction organizations such as ACT Alliance, Church World Service, United Methodist Committee on Relief. Others present were church and church agency representatives from Asia, Europe, Japan, Korea, United States, Christian Conference of Asia, and a cross section of local partners from Japan involved in current relief efforts.

The consultation heard updates about the Japan's situation including the rich relief activities carried out by the Church of Christ in Japan, the Emmaus Center in Sendai, the Korean Christian in Japan, Church World Service, the Sendai Christian Alliance Disaster Relief Network and the United Church of Christ in Japan. The proposed activities are continued relief through provision of necessities, giving care to orphans and trauma counseling, organizing debris removal work teams, rebuilding of infrastructure including church buildings, schools, support for farmers, radiation effect studies, advocacy for social services and alternative source of energy to nuclear power. The response of NCC-Japan (NCCJ) partners amounted to about US$ 66 million while the NCCJ's own ecumenical proposal is about US$ 2 million and the budget proposed by the United Church of Christ in Japan (Kyodan) is US$ 15 million.

The meeting recommends that current and future ongoing relief, recovery and reconstruction activities should be based on the following:

The humanitarian imperative must be operative throughout the process.
Ecumenical organization should coordinate the ongoing response.
Churches in Japan should formulate a clear ecumenical response mechanism.
Humanitarian aid best practices should be the gold standard for intervention.
The ecumenical family will continue to be involved in supporting the efforts of the Japanese churches and the NCCJ in the next phases of the disaster response.

In this connection, pending the finalization of the ecumenical response mechanism, all the church agencies should keep the NCCJ and the CCA North East Asia Forum Coordinator, Victor Hsu, informed of their activities including financial assistance.
The meeting recommends that all churches and ecumenical institutions:

Strengthen the staffing and capacity of NCCJ.
Consider capacity building for all church and ecumenical response programme.
Invite the involvement of ACT International to provide technical assistance both at local and national levels.
Urge the NCCJ to convene a forum of all the Japanese partners to facilitate the exchange of information and activities and explore avenues of cooperation.
Urge the NCCJ and the Japanese churches to consider the establishment of a consortium to respond to the response. This should be done in cooperation with ecumenical church organizations such as the CCA NE Asia Churches Forum, the WCC and ACT Alliance.
Continue psychological trauma counseling and recovery programme.
Ensure advocacy for adequate social services.
Ensure advocacy for reliance on alternative source of energy.

At this time when the natural disaster of earthquake and tsunami has been exponentially compounded by disaster at the Fukushima nuclear power plant, Christians and ecumenical bodies from around the world share a deep concern over the heavy reliance on nuclear power to meet increasing energy needs. The very real threat of nuclear power is plain for all to witness in Japan. However strong the construction guidelines, these plants cannot withstand the onslaught of nature or problems of human failure and arrogance. Chernobyl was a warning that the international community chose to ignore. The problems at Fukushima should not be repeated again for the sake of human life and the integrity of God's creation. Future generations should not be saddled with this generation's inability or refusal to confront the difficult issues of our time.

We call to mind that in 1990, a World Convocation of the World Council of Churches was also held in Seoul. At that meeting Christians affirmed creation as beloved of God and committed themselves to building a culture that can live in harmony with creation's integrity and preserving the gift of the earth's atmosphere to nurture and sustain the world's life. These words are ever more pertinent today.


As members of the Earthquake/Tsunami Relief Ecumenical Solidarity Meeting, taking place in Academy House Hotel, Seoul, Korea, May 6 and 7, 2011:

We call on our governments: To stop the building of new nuclear power generating plants
To commit to the reduction of dependence on nuclear energy for society's use
To seek alternatives to the use of nuclear energy, through a commitment to develop "clean" and "sustainable" technologies, such as wind, solar, etc.

Additionally, We call on our own Christian communities in our nations, and on all people of goodwill
: Be aware that each one of us bears responsibility for our governments' use of nuclear energy to generate power because of our insatiable desire for more and more electricity.
Let us each explore ways to reduce consumption and reduce our dependence on electricity. Let us affirm the whole world as beloved of God and commit ourselves to build a culture that can live in harmony with creation's integrity.



May 7, 2011

Bericht von der Solidaritätskonferenz

6.-7. Mai 2011 im Academy House (PROK) in Seoul, Korea
Unter dem Vorsitz von Pfr. CHANG vom NCC-Taiwan, gleichzeitig Vorsitzender des Forums Christlicher Kirchen nin Nordostasien trafen sich etwa 40 Vertreter verschiedener Geberorganisationen und Vertreter japanischer Kirchen um die bisherigen Aktivitäten auszuwerten und über die dringend gebotene künftige Zusammenarbeit zu beraten.
Es folgt hier der Bericht der Konferenz im Wortlaut. Die Presseerklärung siehe weiter ob auf dieser Seite.

 

National Christian Council of Japan NCCJ

2011年5月16日 月曜日

Record of Japan Solidarity Meeting

RECORD OF PROCEEDINGS
Japan Earthquake/Tsunami Relief Ecumenical Solidarity Meeting
Academy House
Seoul, Korea
May 6-7, 2011
Moderator: Rev. Andrew Chang
NCCT President and Chair of Christian Conference of Asia North East Asia Churches Forum

May 6

Opening Formalities
Catherine Christie, mission co-worker from United Church, Canada, led the opening worship on behalf of the NCCK. Rev. Choi Young-woong of the Presbyterian Church in Korea preached on the theme of the Good Samaritan.

Following the worship the four convenors warmly welcomed the participants. They explained the genesis of this meeting when they met as the Christian Conference of Asia NE Asia Churches Forum in April. The four convenors are Rev. Andrew Chang, President of NCC-Taiwan, Rev. Kim Young Ju, General Secretary of NCC-Korea, Rev. Po Kam-Cheong, General Secretary of the Hong Kong Christian Council and Rev. Hiroko Ueda, Acting General Office Secretary of NCC-Japan. At that meeting they requested Victor Hsu to be the coordinator for this meeting.
After the welcome, the participants introduced themselves and agreed to follow the draft agenda as presented.

Purpose of the Solidarity Meeting

The coordinator, Victor Hsu, explained the objectives of the meeting. He said that the primary objective was to review the activities of the churches in Japan and by the ecumenical movement. After the review it would then be possible to identify the gaps and lay out the tasks facing the ecumenical movement as a whole. He made a presentation that highlighted the best practices in relief, rehab and reconstruction and urged the meeting to plan for an engagement that would take into account quality of the intervention, the sustainability of the proposed activity and the need to provide for the recovery and restoration of the lives of the affected people. He appealed to the meeting to be prepared for a long journey in accompanying the affected people and the NCC-Japan.

Japan Situation Update

Rev. Hiroko Ueda presented a detailed update about the current situation in Tohoku and in Miyagi and Fukushima Prefectures. Her presentation included a detailed proposal for over US$ 2 million. She also indicated that the NCCJ was most grateful to sign an agreement with Church World Service, a member of ACT Alliance. Church World Service was in Japan soon after March 11 and had offered to provide trauma counseling services. After her presentation she invited Yoko Ito to show a video of the CWS visit to the affected area.

Report of Visit to Affected Area in April

The moderator of the meeting, Rev. Andrew Chang, showed slides taken during the visit of the four principles of this ecumenical initiative to support the NCC-J. He entitled his report, "When Jesus Cries" to show both the poignancy of their visit as well as the devastation they witnessed. Rev. Po Kam Cheong and Rev. Kim Young Ju attested to the enormous tragedy that has visited the Japanese people, many of whom fact an uncertain future about their livelihood. Many more feel helpless and are awaiting effective relief. They also spoke of their fear of the Fukushima nuclear threat, citing lack of transparency from the authorities about the real damage to the reactors. They underlined the timeliness of the solidarity meeting and prayed for an effective response.

Presentations by the Churches in Japan

Rev. Makoto Kato shared the plans of the UCC-Japan. He highlighted KYODAN's plans to rebuild several churches that had been totally or partially destroyed. He indicated that the planning has proceeded smoothly and that KYODAN was already receiving funds from its partners around the world.
Rev. Jeffrey Mensendiek talked about the work of the Emmaus Student Center in Sendai. He talked about the number of volunteers who had arrived at the Center as promised by the KYODAN congregations in Tokyo. They included both pastors and non- Christians. They have primarily been involved in removing the dirt from the houses that withstood the earthquake and the tsunami.
Rev. Takashi Yoshida spoke about the work of the Christian Alliance Disaster Relief Network in Sendai of which he is the director. This has been a very significant manifestation of Christian cooperation in the midst of unbelievable destruction, extensive suffering and sadness.
Rev. Yoshida Fujimori spoke of what he termed as the modest effort of his small denomination, the Church of Christ in Japan.
Ms. Yoko Ito spoke about the activities of Church World Service, especially in the area of trauma counseling. She also mentioned a bilateral agreement that had been signed between CWS and NCCJ.

Churches Disaster Relief Experience

Rev. Herman Shastri said that he would encourage the churches to work together and to begin to develop their own disaster response preparedness and expertise. He noted that the disasters are increasing in both magnitude and frequency and the ability of the churches to respond continued to be wanting. As for the Japan disaster, he said that his Council has been a able to raise a modest amount of money and is ready to contribute to the ecumenical initiative.
Rev. Andrew Chang showed a slide presentation of the relief efforts by the Presbyterian Church in Taiwan following the Marokot landslide in southern Taiwan. He also mentioned how generous the Taiwan people had been in responding to the PCT fundraising. He already sent a large amount of money to KYODAN and 200 motorised bikes for the volunteers in Sendai.

Discussion and Clarification of Presentations

The discussion on the presentation was substantial. Participants sought clarification about

  • Nature of the existing response.
  • Information on the actors e.g. were they NGOs or churches?
  • Potential local partners.
  • Amount of aid that had been distributed by the churches and the NGOs.
  • Problems encountered on the ground.
  • Role of the government at national, prefecture and local community levels.
  • Role and response of international NGOs.
  • Role and response of the ecumenical movement.
  • Which ecumenical partners had offered assistance to NCCJ?
  • Role of Church World Service.
  • NCCJ capacity.
  • NCCJ plans.

May 7

The NCCJ led the opening worship.
Hiroko Ueda shared a brief reflection, based on Psalm 46: "God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble." She said that these words assure us that God is there for us -- whenever we are in need, whenever we are in trouble. She has now been twice to the Tohoku region with two delegations. As she walked around Ishinomaki, she felt the presence of God in the silence. God had never left. God suffered along with us. She expressed her conviction that as the NCCJ work together for relief in this disaster with all ecumenical partners and churches, we would hear God's voice.

Moving from Emergency to Relief, Rehabilitation and Reconstruction

John Nduna introduced ACT Alliance to the meeting and spoke about the key issues in the transition from relief to rehab and reconstruction.
He also made a commitment to NCCJ to dispatch 2 ACT professionals to the affected area to assess the situation and to help formulate a cohesive program. He said that this team could be on the ground by mid-July.

Group Task

On the basis of the reports and presentations, Victor Hsu highlighted the urgent tasks of the ecumenical response. He urged that the activities and the response program take into account the best practices in the disaster response industry. He appealed to the meeting to avoid taking convenient measures in terms of activities and staffing because they would not be cost effective and could waste precious resources and time.
Groups Reports are appended.
Their respective agenda was:

Group A: Ecumenical Response to Current Emergency Relief Needs
1. Review of current initiatives by NCCJ partners and members
2. Evaluate existing needs against current relief response
3. Recommend priorities to address gaps
4. Budget and infrastructure requirements

Group B: Ecumenical Response to Long Term Reconstruction Needs

1. Select priorities
2. Identify partners
3. Recommend appropriate strategies e.g. budget and management

Group C: Ecumenical Support NCC-Japan Relief and Reconstruction

1. Setting priorities
2. Identify potential partners within Japan and outside
3. Structure
4. Management, budget and staffing

Victor Hsu was requested to summarise the three group reports and highlighting especially the recommendations.
On the basis of his summation, the participants requested the NCCK General Secretary, Rev. Kim Young Ju, to send a letter to the NCCJ members to express the hope of the meeting to continue to be in solidarity with the people of Japan and to urge the churches in Japan to work together and to explore the possibility of an ecumenical disaster relief consortium.

Melissa Crutchfield led closing worship. In her moving reflection, she spoke about how through her work with UMCOR, responding to other disasters across the globe, what had always struck her was the cycle of renewal and hope that abounds after every crisis. Especially working with and through the church, she said we could witness first-hand how faith in action inspires, restores, revives. She reminded the participants of the beautiful cherry blossoms that grow for all to see in Japan in the spring, an iconic image of spring, renewal, rebirth, hope - after a long winter - or, after an earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disaster. She said that the land will be restored to life, will flourish as before. As the Gospel reminded us about the Resurrection "we just need to believe that life which we thought had ended, had in fact, begun again.

 

Das Kommuniqué des Nationalen Christenrates in Japan (NCCJ) zur Havarie im AKW Fukushima I

vom 11. April 2011
Hinter diesem Kommuniqué steht eine lange Geschichte der Warnung vor unkontrollierbarer Atomkraft im NCCJ.
siehe > hier
oder als pdf-Datei  > hier 

 

National Christian Council of Japan  NCCJ
Quelle: http://japanearthquakenccj.blogspot.com/2011/04/visit-to-disaster-area.html

2011-04-18
Vom 11. - 13. April besuchte ein internationales Team der in der Christian Conference in Asia mit dem NCCJ verbundenen Kirchen das Katastrophengebiet in Nordost-Japan. Der Bericht dieser Delegation wurde auf der Homepage des NCCJ dokumentiert. Die pdf-Version kann > hier  eingesehen/heruntergeladen werden.

 

National Christian Council of Japan NCCJ

Quelle: http://japanearthquakenccj.blogspot.com/2011/03/present-action.html

2011年3月25日 金曜日 Present Action

Dear Friends and Ecumenical Partners in Christ,

Your generous gifts and prayerful support in response to the enormous humanitarian needs following the devastating destruction brought on by the earthquake and tsunami that struck the entire northeastern coast of Japan nearly two weeks ago have been received with much gratitude. Now we are confronted with the additional specter of the worst nuclear disaster in Japan since the end of WWII.

This week we have been successful in holding consultations with our national church partners and member organizations to determine our mutual priorities for a cooperative relief effort. We will be coordinating both the distribution of relief materials to the areas suffering the worst damage and locating temporary housing for those who lost homes due to the earthquake and tsunami as well as those now displaced from the area most exposed to radiation from the damaged nuclear plants.

We have become an indispensable hub for sharing information and dispatching goods and personnel to the worst-hit areas in coordination with the newly established Christian Coalition in Sendai which includes the United Church of Christ in Japan (Kyodan), The Evangelical Alliance Mission (TEAM), various other Protestant bodies and the Roman Catholic Church. The Sendai coalition is using the Emmaus Center which also serves as the Tohoku (NE) District office and Student Center of the Kyodan as its base of operations. As NCCJ Acting General Secretary, Rev. Hiroko Ueda will be making a personal visit tomorrow to consult with the coalition in order to determine the most crucial needs. In principle, NCCJ is seeking to make the most effective use of gifts from overseas ecumenical partners in providing relief for those who are marginalized and have no other channel of support as we continue to consult with our member churches to determine priorities and avoid needless duplication.

Our office is now in the process of finding available housing for internally displaced persons through our national network of churches and organizations. Our home page will be providing regular updates (mostly in Japanese) with occasional English messages. Please contact us if you have any questions or need for further information.
You can use the addresses on this letterhead or email directly to:

relief@ncc-j.org

Our home page is simply: http://ncc-j.org

In Christian love, Rev. Isamu Koshiishi, Moderator
Rev. Hiroko Ueda, Acting General Office Secretary

 

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